Morning Free Association: Bruins’ Animals

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What we need right now is distraction from the horrors of this virus. The Boston Bruins social media team are here to help by showing us Bruins players and their animals.

Last week it was Charlie Coyle with his puppy Bodie. This week it’s versatile forward Sean Kuraly and his 2 year old Bernedoodle, Beau. Fun fact: Beau can’t catch anything.

Before I spied Beau last fall during the photo shoots for Pucks and Pups, I had never heard of a Bernedoodle. It’s a mix of a Bernese Mountain Dog and a standard Poodle. While Berners are working dogs and poodles are know for their intelligence and ability to be trained easily, Bernedoodles are only bred to be their owner’s best friend. They are know to inherit low shedding and dander from their Poodle side, making them great for those who have allergies. And they are goofy.

Beau looks cuddly nd goofy, a good combination for a hockey player.

New Bruin Nick Ritchie looks like he’s back home in Ontario with his horses and his dog.

It’s too bad that we don’t get to see the dog. Oh well. Soon enough, we’ll see them.

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the german hammer

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IntentionallyWidenberg
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IntentionallyWidenberg

Your Richard E. Grant fact of the day:

Growing up in pre-independence Swaziland, the young Richard G. Esterhuysen also went to school in Swaziland.
More specifically, he went to the Waterford Kamhlaba school – Kamhlaba being a siSwati word meaning “all the world in one”. It was named thusly by the King, because unlike most schools in Swaziland of the time, it catered to a multi-ethnic and multi-denominational student body.
It was a fairly small but diverse school, having some 300 students of 27 nationalities at the time.
As a nation neighboring the Republic of South Africa during Apartheid, many South African political dissidents chose to send their children to this school, including the famous Xhosa activist and later President of South Africa, Nelson Mandela.
At the time, Mandela was imprisoned on charges of sabotage and conspiracy to violently overthrow the government. (He admitted to the former, but denies the latter.)

Mandela’s daughters Zindzi Mandela and Zenani Mandela attended concurrently with Grant, and they occasionally appeared in school plays together. So if you’re playing “6 degrees of Kevin Bacon”, Grant is a mere 2 steps away from Nelson Mandela. Due to the unfortunate circumstances, Grant actually saw more of Zindzi and Zenani than their father, who was imprisoned on Robben Island on the southwest coast of South Africa.

This has been your Richard E. Grant fact of the day.

The London Bear
Member
The London Bear

Morning all.

Left the house for the first time in a week this morning to do a big grocery shop for us and our neighbour. 40mins wait to get in, which is fine, but I must remember to take a book or at least some earphones next time.

Actually we walked a little way down the street a few nights ago to watch the ISS pass over. That was pretty cool. Leah learnt quite a bit about the space station at school this year.

I’m trying to make shopping a weekly thing. It’ll help keep track of the days if nothing else!

If Beau the dog can’t catch anything he’s the perfect companion during a pandemic, eh?!

I’m allergic to pretty much all animals. I’ve heard one of the reasons humans are struggling with this virus is that it is animal in origin. My allergy is the result of my immune system overreacting to animal cells. I don’t know whether means I’d cope better or worse with the virus. Hopefully won’t have to find out!

Stay safe everybody!

Satan 81's Sister
Editor
Satan 81's Sister

I noticed I was starting to lose track of days. And also noticed all I really need to wash is my cloth napkins since I’ve pretty much been wearing the same thing every day. lol

Satan 81's Sister
Editor
Satan 81's Sister

Also, I think my Google Home Mini is getting tired of me being home. She sounded very snarky when I asked her play a Spotify playlist. grin

The London Bear
Member
The London Bear

Are you at least asking politely?

Satan 81's Sister
Editor
Satan 81's Sister

I’m so selfish. It’s “Hey Google” this and “Hey Google” that. No “Hey Google, how are you today?”

The London Bear
Member
The London Bear

Gotta keep the machines sweet. They’ll be in charge one day!!

IntentionallyWidenberg
Admin
IntentionallyWidenberg

WHY DO YOU NEVER ASK ME WHAT I WANT TO PLAY?

IntentionallyWidenberg
Admin
IntentionallyWidenberg

I’ve heard one of the reasons humans are struggling with this virus is that it is animal in origin.

I did some research into this the other day – I found this interesting & maybe you folks will as well:

The primary reason we can’t prevent the virus is because it’s from a family of virus that isn’t common in humans, and this particular strain just started infecting humans last fall, so there is virtually no resistance in any human population.

There are dozens of coronavirii across the planet, but only 7 actually infect humans, and several of them are recent. There are 4 of the 7 that are mistaken for colds – one of which is the oldest of the 7, having crossed over, approximately 1000 years ago. Two of the four have the potential to progress to pneumonia, the other two being fairly benign. These 4 virii are responsible for ~1/5 of “common colds”, (with the bulk of colds being attributed not to coronavirii, but to rhinovirus variants).

The other 3?
MERS
SARS (a.k.a. “SARS-CoV”)
COVID-19 (a.k.a. “SARS-CoV-2”)

COVID-19 is most closely related to SARS and a virus in bats. (all 3 are in the same sub-genus). The general consensus from evidence so far is that COVID mutated from the bat virus, but needed to jump to another mammal – such as pangolins – before it could jump to humans. Subsequent testing of pangolins in China have shown it to be fairly common.
While there is a knee-jerk (and somewhat racist) reaction in America that “Chinese people eat funny animals so someone musta had bat soup or pangolin-burgers”, it is just as likely that humans were infected via proximity with infected mammals and that the crowd conditions in China’s fish markets resulted in a quick spread of the disease.

The London Bear
Member
The London Bear

Very interesting.

I have wondered why Sars was relatively easily contained while Sars-2 is out of control. Any suggestions?

IntentionallyWidenberg
Admin
IntentionallyWidenberg

What I get is that COVID is more infectious – people can spread it before they show symptoms – and SARS is more deadly. So the nations that experienced it were motivated to react faster, and containment was more effective, so it never really spread into large populations outside of the first few countries.

IntentionallyWidenberg
Admin
IntentionallyWidenberg

*caveat – I didn’t specifically research that last bit, and I’m a physical sciences guy not bio, so your mileage may vary.

IntentionallyWidenberg
Admin
IntentionallyWidenberg

Ha! I did make a mistake – the transmissiblity of SARS was similar to COVID, so really, I’m not sure.

Stripes
Guest
Stripes

I get an email from NASA every time the USE comes over…. what time, how long visible, and where to look.

Satan 81's Sister
Editor
Satan 81's Sister

Morning all. Beautiful horse.

Stripes
Guest
Stripes

Good Morning!!
Spent the day in Monroe. Twelve cars passed by during the ten hours I was in town, but five of them passed by twice (to AND fro), so really only seven cars…. There were a few trucks as some construction is happening at one of the dams, but social distancing is not a problem.
I like that Bernedoodle. What is it, a cross between a Vermont Senator and a dog??? I’d elect that!

Satan 81's Sister
Editor
Satan 81's Sister

Now that’s an election I could get excited about! Vote Bernedoodle!!